Tag Archives: bullying tips

PRO Grant Education Subsidies Boost School Bullying Prevention Efforts

Pro Grant Education SubsidiesEducation Subsidies are available to assist with the costs of bullying prevention programs which can be featured in your school. Parent Council groups in Ontario often have education subsidies available to them in the form of parent reaching out grants, otherwise known as PRO Grants. Pro Grants can be used for purposes that benefit the whole school and particularly parents. What could be more beneficial to parents in the school, than events and activities to help them learn how to deal with bullying that may involve their children? Schools today teach children how to deal with bullying and most schools feature programs, activities, and curriculum-based learning all geared toward teaching children bullying reduction strategies. Up to now, one of the missing links has often been the parent piece. Parents need to be on the same page as children when it comes to bullying prevention. What are some of the things parents need to know?

1/ Cyber-bullying guidance

2/ How to be proactive & prevent bullying

3/ How to guide children in case bullying incidents occur

Cyber-bullying guidance:
When we present our parent programs in schools, one of the first things we point out is related to internet safety. Parents need to be aware that the computer at home should be located in a central place where everyone goes like the kitchen or family room. Young children should grow up with the idea that Internet usage should be open, and freely shared with each other. It should not be a secretive activity. Another thing we point out is how to provide guidance to children if they do run into a problem online. We need to help our children remain open and trusting, so that if something happens online which is negative, they will share it with us as parents. Keeping communication as open as possible when he children are young is a great first step to helping them when they are older.

How to be proactive and prevent bullying:
Teach your children to walk with confidence. Help your child build strong self-esteem so that they will be sending the message to others, that they are not available as a bullying target. Teach your children to report bullying. Help your children understand that after school it is important to share what has happened during the days’ events. If children get used to sharing their daily activities with family when they are young, there is a much higher chance that they will continue to feel free to share when they are older. Studies have shown that problems occur in children who try to keep all of their frustrations inside.

How to guide children in case of bullying incidents:
If a bullying incident happens, step in immediately to stop the behavior from continuing. Be clear about the facts and understand the difference being telling and tattling. Consult with the teacher, vice-principal or principal. Remain calm, keep an open mind and be discreet. If things don’t improve, meet with the principal again and make a written plan. Be sure to contact police if a bullying incident involves criminal behavior such as sexual assault or the use of a weapon. Check with your school to see if education subsidies have been used to sponsor parent workshops on bullying prevention.

Pro Grants are worthwhile education subsidies that have made many anti-bullying activities a reality in Ontario schools. Parents have told us on numerous occasions that they have benefited from workshops and bullying prevention seminars such as our ‘Stand Up – Keep Your Kids’ evening session.

Bruce Langford presents anti-bullying sessions in schools and workplaces to counter bullying and increase respect
www.standupnow.ca.

Are You Immune to Bullying? Learn about Someone who Is.

I just talked to a 10-year-old boy who told me he is immune to mean comments, teasing and also bullying.
I asked him to explain.

He told me that he just doesn’t let the comment or teasing register in his brain. He just ignores it. He said it is just a natural thing and it isn’t even hard to do.
I asked him, “how long have you had this ability?”
Him: “About one and a half or two years.”
Me: Do you realize that this might mean that you will never be bullied because you will never think of meanness as bullying?
Him: “Yes, I realize that. I think that’s a really good thing.”
Me: “How does this make you feel now that you know that you have this ability?”
Him: “I think it is kind of a super-hero-like power really.”
Me: Yes, I can see that it might be.
Him: Just the other day some kids were saying some mean stuff to me and I didn’t even care.
Me: Do you think they were trying to bully you?
Him: Maybe, but I’m not sure. They just stopped because I didn’t give them a reaction.
Me: Do you think there are very many other people with this power you are describing?
Him: I don’t know anyone else.
Me: Do you think other people could develop this power, or is it only reserved for certain people?
Him: I think there are a few people that could do it, but I think most people can’t.
Me: What do you think a bully would do if they knew you had this super-power?
Him: Leave me alone.
Me: Do you think you have any other super powers?
Him: (Thoughtfully) I’m not sure, maybe.

I have never talked to someone who described themselves as being immune to mean remarks and bullying before. I think this is quite interesting. If you have any comments, I would be pleased if you would share them in the comment box. Thanks.

Bruce Langford, Anti-bullying advocate and school presenter  www.standupnow.ca 
905-233-2102

3 Amazing Quotes which offer Bullying Advice to those being Bullied

“It gets better. It seems hard, you know, I think being different is always gonna be a tough climb. There’s always gonna be people that are scared of it. But at the end of the day you give those bullies, those people, that are so ignorant, if you give them the power to affect you, you’re letting them win. And they don’t deserve that. What you’re doing by being yourself is you’re keeping it real, and you’re being really brave.”
Adam Lambert

“When people see you’re happy doing what you’re doing, it sort of takes the power away from them to tease you about it.”
Wendy Mass, Every Soul A Star

“With ignorance comes fear- from fear comes bigotry. Education is the key to acceptance.”
Kathleen Patel, The Bullying Epidemic-the guide to arm you for the fight

Bruce Langford , anti-bullying advocate and speaker www.brucelangford.ca

 

Does the violence and bullying in The Hunger Games mean it should be rated PG-13?

The Hunger Games and Bully Movie RatingsRecently I noticed that The Hunger Games has received a PG-13 rating in United States while the new movie, Bully has been rated R for language. I’d like your opinion on those ratings. (U.S. ratings) Shouldn’t a movie that teaches about the reality of the bullying epidemic in our country’s schools be available for our youth to see? Some say The Hunger Games should be rated R.
I have included a teenage girl’s review of The Hunger Games below. Let me know what you think.

THE HUNGER GAMES REVIEW
I consider myself a bit of an expert on the Hunger Games because I have actually read the series four times. I first read them just as they were coming out, waiting many months for each book. I loved the hunger games because the characters were very real. The way Katniss dealt with things was not glorified, it was honest. I think Katniss Everdeen, Peeta Mellark, Haymitch Abernathy, Cinna, Finnick Odair, President Snow, Primrose Everdeen, Gale Hawthorne and the other characters really stood out to me in that they each had something completely different about them that added to the story. I have always liked futuristic novels, and this series was full of constant suspense and adventures that made it impossible to stop reading.

I think that someone could benefit from reading The Hunger Games by learning how corrupt society can become if we let it. The world has always been full of sin and people should know that it is real and that people can do sadistic and extreme things for power and control. This is represented in the Capital’s domination of the other districts. Throughout the Hunger Games series, however, the reader sees that no matter how strong the Capital appears to be, there are always “chinks in the armour” and opportunities to rebel. This will never happen, though, if no one has the courage and determination to fight.

There is a lot of controversy surrounding the Hunger Games series as the movie comes out, and some are saying the themes in this series are evil. I do not believe that this is true at all. Yes there is violence and death throughout the books, but most fantasy novels feature this (Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, any series, really). The important thing to remember is that these are not children’s books. The Hunger Games books were meant for young adults and should be treated and viewed accordingly. This books do not condone violence, it fights against it.
In my opinion children under the age of 14 should not be allowed to read The Hunger Games. It is not because they are severely inappropriate; it is because although the books really have nothing the kids don’t see in video games, I do not see a child clearly grasping the point of the series. The corruption, romance and rebellion can be much better understood by an older reader as there are some very complicated factors in the novels.

I do not think The Hunger Games series should be made into a movie because many main points and details will be mixed, diluting the series. In my opinion, don’t see the movie, read the books!
Alyssa Jeavons, Student Lord Dorchester Secondary School, Dorchester Ontario Canada Thames Valley District School Board (TVDSB)

Bruce Langford, anti-bullying advocate and school presenter http://www.standupforrespect.com

Hastings, Prince Edward Counties – Verbal & Physical Bullying To End

Belleville Ontario CanadaA 10-year old girl in Belleville Ontario is taking a stand against bullying at her school. She says verbal and physical attacks toward her have been ongoing and she has had enough. She wrote a letter explaining details about the bullying she has been experiencing. She says she spends recess in the kindergarten room because nobody will play with her, and explains that she feels alienated and dejected. Her mother believes that the school staff is not protecting her daughter.
These are certainly serious allegations. Although I don’t know all the details surrounding the situation, I have a few suggestions to hopefully calm the waters.
1. I encourage the girl’s parents to set up a meeting with the teacher. Have a list of concerns to address and suggested outcomes. Take notes. Insist on a specific plan of action.
2. After 5 days, re-evaluate the situation. Has the bullying stopped? Has the situation improved? If not, set up a meeting with the principal and make a written plan. Set a date for a follow-up meeting to talk about whether or not things have improved. No child should feel unsafe at school.
3.  Ask to see the bullying prevention action plan set out by the school. Ask what initiatives have been put into place to encourage respect and reduce bullying. Insist that you are looking out for the well-being of your child.

Do not give up. Continue to connect with the teacher or administrators to carry out the plan of action. If the plan of action is not working, insist on an alternative. Be aware of the Hasting and Prince Edward District School Board’s commitment to providing caring, safe, respectful and inclusive learning environments for all students.  Do your best to remain calm and professional, yet strong with your assertions that your child be provided with the caring, safe and respectful environment referred to by the school board.
I will be most interested in the outcome of this situation and am optimistic it will come to a positive conclusion for all involved.

Bruce Langford provides bullying prevention programs for schools. www.brucelangford.ca

 

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with a vow to Stand Up Against Bullying

Stand Up Against Bullying ShamrockSt. Patrick’s Day 2012 is upon us so I decided to google Irish Bullying tips.
What I learned was shocking.
25 per cent of Irish students in Irish secondary schools are bullied according to the website bully4u dot ie. One in four or 175,000 youth in Irish high schools are victims of bullying. The website states: “the evolution of modern communication technologies combined with the increasing integration of our multicultural society has led to such new dynamics as cyberbullying and racist bullying in addition to the more traditional forms.”

The site goes on to encourage adult intervention in bullying incidents. It tells us that it is important for adults to let students know that aggressive behaviour is inappropriate. “Whether you are a bystander, parent or schoolteacher, there are steps you can take to ensure that children are kept safe and that their dignity is respected.”

As we celebrate St. Patrick’s day around the world, make a vow to ‘Stand Up Against Bullying’ and make a difference by empowering yourself and others to act against bullying behaviour.

Bruce Langford is an international speaker and anti-bullying advocate
www.BruceLangford.ca   www.StandUpAgainstBullying.com

 

 

 

Talk out your bullying problems using a non-confrontational approach

Talk it out, talk it out, talk it out!

If you are being bullied, don’t keep it all inside you. You can talk it out with the person who is making life tough for you – as long as you do it in a non-confrontational way. Make sure you don’t sound threatening, and don’t display anger or frustration. Just stay cool, and casually talk it out with them.

If you are experiencing bullying on a regular basis, find someone you can talk to; find a trusted friend or adult; find a teacher or councilor. Talk out a situation that is bothering you and it can make all the difference in how quickly you are able to resolve the conflict.

Don’t have anyone to talk to?

Boy talking to dogTalk to yourself or your pet. If you don’t have anyone to talk to, call ‘KidsHelpPhone’ at 1-800-668-6868. You can also jot down your thoughts in a journal. This can really help you work through your problems. Just remember, keeping anger and frustration locked inside can eventually cause problems.

Talk it out in the most safe and confidential way possible.

Stand Up Now Productions –LiveSchoolShows about Bullying & Conflict Resolution with teacher/presenter Bruce Langford.

www.brucelangford.ca

Keep your temper in check when dealing with bullying

ImageParents of children with emotional problems face extra challenges when dealing with bullying. Extra care must be taken that adults in these situations are not overly harsh in their discipline and that they maintain complete control of their emotions. Mom, Dad and any other care givers should always make sure to keep tempers in check, otherwise the adult-child relationship can become strained very quickly. Consistency is one of the most important factors when dealing with children and this cannot be emphasized too much with children who have emotional problems.

 

Entertaining, musical assemblies and workshops for children to help beat bullying in schools –
Contact Stand Up Now Productions at:
www.brucelangford.ca

How to connect with others and grow self-esteem

ImageWe all have a need to belong and feel connected to other people. The people we associate with in our lives are like the links in a chain. Every link is a necessary part of the chain. Most of us feel connected to our families and have good feelings that are associated with family members and relatives. Think of a family member or relative you look up to. What are the reasons you admire that person? Make a list of their qualities that you like the most.

Being part of a club or team can also help people feel connected to others. Think about your interests and then consider whether there might be a group or team you can join where you will be participating in the activity you love. You will be sure to develop connections with some of the people you are sharing your activity with.

Being connected with people will help to reduce the chance that you will be bullied. It will help you build self-esteem and you will be happier over all.

Bruce Langford’s School Programs to teach respect, build confidence & grow self-esteem can be found at http://www.standupnow.ca

6 Ways To Stand Up Against Bullying During Bullying Awareness Week in Ontario

Bullying Prevention LogoNov 13 to Nov 19 is Bullying Awareness and Prevention Week. The theme is ‘Stand Up To Bullying’. You can ‘Stand Up Against Bullying’ by getting actively involved. Here are some things you can do:

  1. Write a song and share it with your family, school, radio station or You-Tube
  2. Talk to an expert and find out ways you can volunteer with their organization
  3. If you are a student, talk to your student council rep about having a ‘Stand Up Against Bullying’ day at your school
  4. If you are employed at a school,  start a poster campaign to raise awareness
  5. If you are being bullied – talk to someone; write about it and then try to make changes in your life so the bullying will stop.
  6. If you bully people, take a vow to stop this destructive behaviour – it not only hurts others, it hurts you.

 Together, we can all help stop bullying!
Visit www.standupagainstbullying.com

Winston Churchill and how to Stand Up Against Bullying Using 5 Key Character Traits

Winston Churchill was a man known for his strong character traits. When we talk about ways to beat bullying, just imagine how Winston Churchill would have done his part to ‘Stand Up Against Bullying’.

Winston ChurchillHe had
COURAGE. He was willing to move forward regardless of whether the majority of people agreed with him or not. That kind of courage requires an underlying
CONFIDENCE that is gained from experience and strength of character. Confidence can also be built through self-talk, study and
DETERMINATION. Think of a laser beam pointing in one specific direction and never wavering from its target. That is like the determination of Winston Churchill when he became Prime Minister at the age of sixty-five. It is also like the determination of a person who is focusing on making the world a better place by eliminating bullying. Winston Churchill also had tremendous
PERSEVERANCE as he wasn’t willing to give up easily. His perseverance helped him move through his election defeat in 1945 when he was voted out by the same people he had earlier led to victory. In spite of that defeat, he remained grounded and stayed on as leader of the opposition. Later he was elected as prime minister again in 1950.

Think of Churchill and these four character traits when you deal with bullying situations. What would Churchill have done? Would he have given up, or continued to persevere?

We visited Winston Churchill Public School in Chatham yesterday and were impressed with the students and the serious attitude they had in regard to Standing Up Against Bullying. Principal, Leslie Boulton was very pleased with the three assemblies and told us they were “even better than our last visit to her school”. That was when she was principal at Harwich Raleigh Public School (Lambton Kent District School Board) in 2005.
Remember to ‘Stand Up Against Bullying’.

Blenheim Neighbourhood Watch Hosts Anti-Bullying Speaker, Bruce Langford

Bullying will decrease when everyone starts to care. That is the belief of the Blenheim Neighbourhood Watch Group which started looking for a guest speaker on the topic last spring. Kim Dagenais is the president of the group and was instrumental in locating a speaker with experience and knowledge in the field of bullying prevention. Bruce has been presenting workshops in Ontario for a number of years.

The information covered in the Neighbourhood Watch workshop was cyberbullying, family dynamics, facebook and how to cope with tough bullying situations.

Here is a tip that Bruce shared during the talk in Blenheim:

Sit with your children and discuss the ground rules for internet use in your home. Talk with your family about expectations on the web and regarding the use of cell phones.

This tip can make a big difference later, if a complicated challenge arises involving cyberbullying.
Visit Blenheim Neighbourhood Watch on Facebook!

Bruce Langford does talks and presentations across Ontario on the topic of bullying and cyberbullying. He can be contacted at through ‘Stand Up Now Productions’.

6 Ways to Keep From Crashing Due to a Pre-Teen Dilemma

1. Assess the situation rationally by writing down the details in a factual way
2. Talk over the dilemma with a trusted adult. This could be a parent, teacher, councillor, friend or other relative. Call a confidential counseling service like ‘KidsHelpPhone’ if you don’t have anyone else to talk to.
3. Continue to eat regular, nutritious meals and snacks. Stress can cause many people to lean to junk food or foods and drinks containing ‘uppers’ like caffeine. So called ‘energy’ drinks can also throw your body out of equilibrium.
4. If you have pets, they can help lower your stress level. Walk your dog, play with your cat, watch your fish or ride your pony. Spend extra time caring for your pets and you may start to feel more relaxed.
5. Make sure you maintain your sleep schedule so you don’t get over tired. That can add more stress to a situation that is already difficult.
6. Keep up your regular schedule of physical activities. Consider adding more activities if you are not a very active person. Even a simple walk can help you feel better.

We offer ideas to help kids deal with bullying situations and other challenges. Visit our website at http://www.standupnow.ca

Waterloo Catholic School Shares Bullying Prevention Strategies

St. Teresa Catholic School, Elmira‘Be The Change’ is the ongoing slogan that St. Teresa of Avila Catholic School in Elmira lives by. Be The Change has a deep meaning to the students at St. Teresa. Every person knows they have a responsibility to look out for others and to take the initiative to speak up if something needs to be said. They know that it only takes one person to make a difference and that one person is you.
Principal, Sherry Peeples is determined to make a difference at St. Teresa. She is behind the theme of the year which is ‘Let Your Light Shine’. It ties right in with the ongoing theme of ‘Be The Change’, and puts the focus on each student to step out and be positive with one another. Students understand they can encourage others by interacting with kindness as described in the bible.
Ms. Peeples has been encouraging the students at St. Teresa for three years and has definitely made a positive difference. She believes that guest presentations can make an impact on the school climate. Following our ‘Stand Up For Respect’ assembly, she commented:
“Wow – fantastic show! I really enjoyed the creativity involved with the presentation of the Stand Up Now assembly. Bruce intertwined student engagement, student interaction, music, and the message of our faith and Respect in a way that the students will remember for a long time to come! Entertaining and meaningful!”
Sherry Peeples, Principal St. Teresa of Avila Catholic School, Elmira Ontario

Mississauga Public School has MAGIC formula to beat bullying

Meadowvale Village Public School in Mississauga recently hosted Stand Up Now Productions with speaker Bruce Langford. We focused on bullying with emphasis on Meadowvale MAGIC. What a great way to help focus on important concepts that all kids need to live by. Here is the ‘magic’ formula:

M anners
A chievement
G ood Sportsmanship
I nitiative
C ooperation

Meadowvale Village MAGIC Logo

We shared our ‘Stand Up Against Bullying’ songs and videos with the students who were filled with enthusiasm. Later, one of the teachers came back to comment on the show.
“I loved it! It was great. You kept me and my class totally engaged for the entire time.”
Barb Linton, Grade 2 Teacher, Meadowvale Village Public School, Mississauga.

We talked about initiative and how it related to our role plays where one person takes the initiative to make a difference. The outcome of a scenario can be totally changed by the decision of one person to handle things differently from the crowd.
Meadowvale Village Vice-Principal, Sara Damasco said she was very pleased with the bullying prevention assemblies presented by Stand Up Now Productions.

Contact info is: www.standupnow.ca or 519-269-9837

 

 

Education Week Assemblies in Toronto Feature 5 Key Strategies to Stop Bullying Behaviours

Madoc Drive School SignEducation Week at Madoc Drive Public School was celebrated today with bullying prevention assemblies by Bruce Langford of ‘Stand Up Now Productions’.
The students were filled with enthusiasm as DJ, Benny DL went live on ATFM Radio. He talked about 5 Key Strategies to Stop Bullying Behaviours.

  1. Ignore the Bullying Behaviour (sometimes the person is just trying to get attention)
  2. Say ‘Please Leave Me Alone’ (Say it in a confident way, but only once)
  3. Tell a Parent, Teacher or other Trusted Adult
  4. Get Friends to Help You
  5. Show your Confidence

 Front Foyer at Madoc Drive SchoolMadoc students acted out real-life scenarios and participated in songs. A student came up afterwards commenting about the ‘great music and awesome video’. Madoc Principal, Mr. Tim Peterson makes sure students set exellent examples to inspire others. Logo for Education WeekEducation week is a great time to focus on bullying prevention. Just remember the 5 Key Strategies to Stop Bullying Behaviours.

http://www.standupagainstbullying.com/

Safe At Schools Conference at Nobleton Senior Public School, Greater Toronto

Sign at Nobleton Senior Public SchoolStand Up Now featured Bruce Langford as the keynote presenter at Nobleton’s 4th annual Safe At Schools Conference on Monday.

Principal, Ms. Nancy Redmond gave a warm welcome to the students to launch the day’s activities at Nobleton. The students from Nobleton Junior Public School were guests for the day as they participated in crafts, workshops and the ‘Stand Up Against Bullying’ assemblies featuring student dramas, videos and student interaction.
Nobleton PS MascotThe grade 6, 7 & 8 ‘Stand Up Against Bullying’ presentation was geared directly to the intermediate level with stories and discussion which the students could relate to. It also included scenarios acted out by the students as well as life-like situations depicted in video clips.
Following the presentation, a number of intermediate students rushed to the front to find out more information from presenter, Bruce Langford.

A bullying prevention tip that was key in the presentation revolved around declaring Nobleton a bullying free zone by having the grade 6,7 & 8 students take a vow to ‘Stand Up Against Bullying’.

Tip: Resolve to take action when you see a bullying situation.

Nobleton PS under constructionNobleton Public School is a school where students definitely will take action as they ‘Stand Up Against Bullying’. We thank the students, administrators, and organizer, Ms. Deborah Godin, for a warm welcome to Nobleton and a truly rewarding day with your students!

5 Bullying Prevention Tips Offered at Lambton-Kent School Assemblies

Bullying, respect and cyber-bullying assemblies were all theme driven assemblies we presented at Gregory Drive Public School in Chatham on Wednesday (Lambton-Kent District School Board – LKDSB). Bruce Langford was also guest speaker at the parent evening session designed for parents and children on internet safety, parenting and bullying. We were impressed with the audience size for a school of under 300 students!

There were 46 adults and children present to see videos, student role-plays and participate in a discussion on the topic of bullying.  

The Grizzlies Den at Gregory Drive SchoolHere are some valuable bullying prevention tips we offered in the various assemblies:

  1. Beware of on-line polls where anonymous comments can be posted. Comments can be mean-spirited, hurtful and devastating.
  2. Unplug your web-cam when you aren’t using it.
  3. If someone is bullying you, speak up in a non-confrontational way.
  4. Build a small group of supportive, trustable friends. You can help each other if necessary.
  5. Don’t meet people you have met on-line as they may not be the person they said they were. Internet luring has become a big problem.

Gregory Drive PS BuildingPrincipal, Ms. Lynn Sulman administers an impressive school. Her staff and students obviously work together to create an excellent, safe school environment making it an amazing Lambton-Kent school! Kudos to you, Ms. Sulman.

Ontario Kids Get Bullying Help at Kids Help Phone

Our ‘Stand Up Now’ workshops encourage bullied children to talk to a trusted adult about feelings and issues. Express yourself and don’t keep frustration and hurt inside. Tell someone!

We also say, if you don’t have a trusted person to talk with, call ‘Kids Help Phone’ at 1-800-668-6868.
The Kids Help Phone website at http://www.kidshelpphone.ca/ helps you with topics like:

Bullying – Being bullied? Don’t keep it inside. Tell someone.
Violence & abuse
Feelings
The internet
Money
My Body
Friends
Dating
Express yourself – Your space to write letters, share stories, and get stuff off your chest.

The Kids Help Phone Promise is here:
“We are here to help you, not get you into trouble. When you call us, you don’t have to tell us your name, address or phone number.”

We encourage you to call Kids Help Phone if you need to talk about a bullying situation.
‘Stand Up Now’ School Programs www.standupagainstbullying.com

Anger Management and Bullying Prevention in Toronto Ontario

We have presented workshops to hundreds of children in the greater Toronto area.
Here are some tips about anger:

  1. Try to figure out why you are angry. Ask yourself questions to find out.
  2. Try to leave the situation that is causing the anger. If you can’t, take ten deep breaths and let each one out slowly.
  3. Wait before you do or say anything. If you say or do something in anger, you may be sorry later. You are responsible for your words and actions.
  4. Get moving. Be active. Anger is often released by exercise and activity.
  5. Write down your thoughts. Let them pour out. Don’t worry about spelling or grammar. Keep this to yourself until you have read it over and some time has passed. Things may seem different by that time.
  6. If you still feel angry, find a trusted adult to talk to. Share your thoughts and listen to the adult’s advice. If you don’t know who to talk to, call Kids Help Phone 1-800-668-6868.

    Anger can cause bullying. Anger can cause people to be bullied. We all have anger at times. Try to deal with your anger without being mean to others. Bruce Langford presents workshops on bullying prevention to help with relationship issues.

www.StandUpAgainstBullying.com